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C - Diary Pages 26 through 45

 

PAGE 26
 

We women who love our men have to overlook in them some things we shall never understand.  If we love enough, we can.  You will find joy again with your husband, as he will find it with you.  And you will appreciate each other more, I expect, than you ever did.


 
PAGE 27
 

Ellen Glasgow writes –

No life is so hard that you can’t make it easier by the way you take it. (how true)  

The man who is allways seeking lost memories is not very different from the rest of u for most of us go through life seeking something (Ellen Glasgow) “We come from God who is our Home” and to him we return at the end of the day (Gay) 

Bear shame any glory with an equal peace and an ever quiet heart I have tried to remain calm and keep a levle head when faced with the ups and downs of life.  However there are 2 things that upset us all alike love and a toothache – and our life is so full of that (philosophy)
 

  External Links referencing above scripts:

[Ellen Glasgow on Wikipedia]
 

 

The book is coarse in spots, but life is coarse in spots story is very beautiful in spots just as life is.  We do not dwell upon man’s lower nature any more than we have to in life, but we know it exists and we pass over it charitably and are surprised how much there is of fineness that comes out of baser clay.  Even from life’s sorrow some good must come.  What could be a better illustration than the closing chapter of this book?
 


 
PAGE 30
  The Bibical Adage – In whatever sate I am, therewith to be contint.

 
PAGE 31
 

Our cash income in (xxxxx) was $ (xxxxx) a  year (xxxxx) was a bargain in the neighborhood (xxxxx) the years.  We pay no annual percent tax on countless happy evenings at home with parlor games fudge and popcorn    Our great wealth is the comfort and joy we have in our children.  The privelage of living in American, our wonderful health, our happiness without measure.  Mother of 7
 

  Transcriber's Notes:

The text above is water stained and almost impossible to read.  In attempting to detect the slight indentation from the pressure of the pen on the paper, it MAY read that Gay indicated her "cash income in 1939 was $550 a year".
 


 
PAGE 32
  Gladly did I live and gladly die and I laid me down with a will.
  External Links referencing above script:

[Epitaph of Robert Louis Stevenson from Wikipedia]
[Epitaph of Robert Louis Stevenson from Successful Scots]
 


 
PAGE 34
 

Crepe Romaine

Send garments of crepe romaine only to the best cleaners because it will shrink unless pressed by an expert. 

Built for It.

Waiter (on his day off) – Those Egyptians must have been good at dealing them off the arm – Lustiga Blaetter, Berlin. 

Gathered Skirts 

Skirts in the two-piece dresses this season are usually gathered, pleated or shirred in front.

 Yellow Kasha 

A charming ensemble for a debutante is of yellow kasha and silk, the dress being of silk with bands of kasha and the coat of kasha with collar and cuffs of silk. 

Fitted Lines 

The closer-fitting lines of frocks have necessitated a closer-fitting design for lingerie.  Many of the new combinations are fitted at the waist with little darts. 

Silk Braid 

Fine silk braid is used in very rich patterns, to decorate sport and day-time gowns of crepe silk.

Short Coats 

Short coats of velvet in rich colors are being worn with the dressier types of georgette and crepe de chine sport dresses.
 


 
PAGE 35
 

By William L. Young

The flowers I plant this spring – some must be red
(As valiant and as loving as his heart),
Carnations, salvias, roses richly fed
With God’s own sunshine when the snows depart.
The flowers I plant this spring – some must be white
(As faithful and as noble as his vow),
Alyssum, lilies, sweet peas, tulips bright
Must make him feel we are remembering now.

The flowers I plant this spring – some must be blue
(As worthy and as honest as his eyes),
Delphiniums and phlox and pansies true,
Forget-me-nots of yesterday’s good-byes.

For over what is mine in Flander’s row
This year the patient poppies may not blow.

 

 

The Lads in Denim Blue

Dear Editor:  All the talk of the day is about the man in uniform.  Of course, there is a great deal of glamour to a uniform, and our best wishes are with the boy who wears one.  But practically nothing is ever said of a blue uniform which does just as much service and is equally patriotic.

I am thinking of the lads in denim blue, not navy blue, who should have our thoughts part of the time, especially when we need food as much as we do now.  It takes real courage to stay home and farm these days – oftentimes more courage than it takes to go.

Songs and verses are dedicated to lads in Khaki; I think it’s about time to dedicate one to the boy who stays at home to till the land – the patriotic, brave lad in denim overalls!  Mrs. Ruth Runion, New York.

 


 
PAGE 36
  W. D. Zinn.  Died the winter of 1937.
  Transcriber's Notes:

The script above was hand-written by Gay on the side of the newspaper clipping transcribed below. The clipping indicates it is continued on page 28.  However, the page could not be found in the diary.

External Links referencing script below:

[W. D. Zinn Historical Marker in Philippi, WV from Waymarking.com]

     
 

Farm Practice
By W. D. Zinn

C. E. – It is little wonder that your alfalfa ran out if you have not applied phosphorus and lime recently.  Alfalfa is a heavy feeder of both these plant foods.  Where the subsoil conditions are right I see no reason why alfalfa should run out if it is properly fed. 

Your chances for getting a good catch on that field are much better than they would be on a field where you never grew alfalfa.  First, the subsoil has been opened up by the alfalfa roots, and the soil is thoroughly inoculated.  Manure will be splendid to apply, but in addition you should make heavy annual applications of phosphorus.  The more manure, the greater the need you have for phosphorus, because manure is short of this element of plant food.  On Woodbine we never applied a ton of manure that was not directly or indirectly reinforced with phosphorus.  There are about 313 good days in a year to haul manure from the barn, but every load should be reinforced with phosphorus.                       

Our practice on Woodbine was to haul manure as it accumulated at the barn.  In the fall we began to top-dress the meadow land that we expected to plow for corn in the spring.  One year we top-dressed a strip about two rods wide and for some reason this ten-acre plot was not plowed for three years.  When he began to plow the plowman asked what I had done to that strip on the outside to make the sod so much better there than elsewhere.  There had been but four tons per acre of reinforced manure applied to this land and that showed the effects for three years afterward.  I think this answers your question as to whether it paid. 

One farmer writes he does not need to buy fertilizer because he has so much manure.  Unless he has more manure than will cover his land with six or eight tons per acre on all his crops, including pastures and meadows, it will pay him to reinforce his manure with 40 pounds phosphorus per ton of manure.  This is not true because I say so, but it is correct because our stations say so.

W. K. – If you have grazing land that is worth $200 per acre there is a question whether you could afford to keep a cow for just her calf, but if you have rather cheap grazing land there is no question about your being able to keep the cow.  We have in our state a Four-H calf club sale every year.  Those calves bring on an average over $30 a head.  Last year they brought over $31, and yet the purchasers made a good profit feeding the calves, and this was not an isolated case by any means.  The business paid because nothing but good cows were kept. 

I do not refer to any particular breed, but of course if you want to grow good beef animals you must start with a good beef breed.  If you are not going to go into the pure-bred business a collection of a good herd of grade cows may make you just as much money   The sire should always be a pure-bred.  By proper selection you can soon have a well-bred set of cows at a very small outlay of cash. 

F. N. – For many years I have been studying the alfalfa plant and the more I study it the more I find there is to learn about it.  A few years ago I had a bunch in the lawn.  I put it there so I could see it every day and learn more about it.  For some time it grew an inch a day and looked as vigorous as a plant could look (continued on page 28.) 

 


 
PAGE 37
 

The Cloverleaf American 

“Sportsmen Adopt New Breed of Dog, the Basset Hound” 

NEW YORK – There is a new star in dogdom that threatens to outshine any breed that has been introduced in American within the past generation. 

It is the basset hound, still a novelty in this country, but a recognized sports champion in Europe for three centuries.

The basset rose to its greatest fame in France in the middle of the seventeenth century.  Some time during his early history a bloodhound strain was introduced into the species and now, although the basset blood is nearly pure, some traces of the mixed ancestry can be noticed.  The legs of the basset are short, heavily toned and usually very crooked.  For all that he covers the ground like a flash and has been used in Europe for hunting deer, wild board, wolf, hares, foxes and quail. 

The fact that he is qualified to take the place of the spaniel makes the basset a particular favorite for hunting.

 

 

Here is a new picture of Mr. and Mrs. Wilhelm Hohenzollern, Doorn, Holland, with Mrs. Hohenzollern's youngest daughter, Henriette, and the Hohenzollern's dog.  The former kaiser is now one of the richest men in Europe through a settlement with Prussia that went into effect the other day granting Wilhelm $50,000,000 worth of royal properties and several million marks.
 

 

External Links referencing script above:

[Wilhelm II, German Emperor from Wikipedia]
[Hollenzollern "Amen" - article from Time dated May 26, 1930]


 
PAGE 44
  Ann Wines Birthday on this day

Age 12.
 

  Transcriber's Notes:

The handwriting of the script above does not match Gay's.  We may presume the entry was written by Ann.  The date on this calendar page reads Sunday, February 7.  The year would have been 1945.

Internal Link referencing script above:

[Delane "Ann" Wines at the Spiker Family Gathering Place]


 
PAGE 45
 

I must Get Roberts Browning’s Book

“Grow old along with me!  The best is yet to be.  The last of life - for which the first was made.”

Nothing is sadder not to know the truth of Brownings words.  Nothing more rewarding thatn to live by them.  Their is much of the “last of life” to enjoy as the first, maby more.  Accept and live by the blessed idea that the best is yet to be and you’ll have a rich, full span on this earth, wasting none of it in future fears or vane regrets.  Many strange, exciting things belong to youth.  I’m glad I missed none of them.  But they pass out of our existence in due time and we must let things go and be ready to take others just as good or better.  Their are those who store nothing in those splendid reckless young years to fill the later ones.  The think of happiness in terms of what youth alone can be and know and do.  For them the last of life can be barren, cold, sometimes ugly in its attempt to prolong that youth.  But those that plant seeds of love, service, friendship, know the last of life as a privilage and a continuing adventure.  The feavers of the blood die down.  The spirit grows serene.  Friendships grow holier with shared years.  Memories become hallowed, beauty can be enjoyed without the torturing need for possession, humor becomes part of wisdom and service is a gift worth offering to those still on the Battlefield of youth.  The harvest of work well done, of love freely given is ripe for reeping.  The books we never had time to read, the people we never had time to talk to, the games we never watched because we were so busy playing them, the prayers we never had time to say, the God we never had time to know – all these can be ours at last.  And when that chapter ends surely the Best of All is – yet to be.

(xxxxx) grow old also.  Words to live by.  Gay.
 
 

External Links referencing script above:

[Robert Browning on Wikipedia]